“Know yourself. Be yourself. Love yourself. Seek goodness and be goodness. Seek beauty and be beauty. Seek love and be love.” ― Bryant McGill, Voice of Reason

19 December 2010

Musical Instrument Museum

A friend and I went to the Musical Instrument Museum.

I took a lot of photos and didn't come close to capturing the whole museum. There is a lot to see and hear and learn about.

I was amazed at the variety of materials used to make an instrument. Anything from garbage like a tin can to the finest woods and materials available to man. I think my favorites include instruments made from plant materials such as nuts, seeds, shells, etc.

I was also amazed at the number of countries I'd never heard of. I need to learn more about world geography!

The MIM security mobile.


Africa. We actually own footed drums similar to this. While we have a wide variety of them, I enjoyed seeing others in the museum. I was able to compare how they're made, the carvings, the materials used, etc.


Africa. The stringed instrument has a round ball that is fur covered for decoration. We also own a wooden xylophone similar to this except that ours has gourds on it.


Africa. More drums, wooden xylophones, and other instruments.


Africa. So much to see.


Africa. The vary large metal bells were carried by someone very strong :)


I have an appreciation for the older items, they have a certain quality about them.


Turkey. Stringed instruments ranged from two strings to many strings.


Pretty inlay.


I liked the carving of the horse head. And, beside the stringed instrument is a rattle made of bull scrotum, fur intact, attached to a bone.


Horse head.


The Orient.


Mongolia. Very flashy costumes. Yet very simple instruments.


Boat lutes. I thought these were interesting.


Burma. These were indoor instruments. A drummer would sit inside the round piece.


Where the drummer sits.


More of the Orient, so much to see. That's my museum going buddy taking in the Beijing Opera.


Asian masks.


Lutes. These had many strings.


A close up of the lute strings.


Peru's Scissors Dance. The dancers in the video wore the same shoes as the model in the museum. The scissors weren't literal scissors but cymbals.


A rattle made from a discarded spray paint can.


A rattle made from seeds.


A rattle made from seashells. These are so cute I would probably never take them off.


Australia and New Zealand. I've always been fascinated by the intensity of the Haka dance.


A bagpipe. Made from a whole calf skin.


A variety of Russian instruments.


Another unique looking bagpipe.


A variety of instruments from Wales.


A variety of instruments from France. The curly instrument looks difficult to play. I also liked the animal heads on the others.


Zydeco. One of my favorites. When I lived in the South, we would visit a restaurant that played live Zydeco music and I loved to sit and watch the dancers, it was so much fun.


Martin guitars display.


A Theremin. I call it the touch-me-not of musical instruments.


The glasses were played with wet fingertips to create musical notes. The display said that many "harmoniconists" had nervous breakdowns, it was believed to be due to the lead content in the glasses.


Taiko drums. Another favorite of mine, the whole body is used to play these drums.


This may have been one of the Bluegrass displays. My son plays the violin, I've asked him to learn the guitar and then the dobro.


Blues. Despite the title of 'blues', I think Blues music is happy music.


The Native American display. I thought this was lacking, especially since the museum was located in the Southwest.


Native American leg rattles. Poor turtles.


Ukuleles. From my roots, native Hawaii.


Last but not least, my museum going friend, "Teci". Thank you for adding your personal touch by sharing your thoughts, questions and quiet reflection. It adds flavor to the museum visit and makes it unique.

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